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Types of Royalties

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Screenrights collects and pays secondary royalties from Australia and New Zealand. Read below to learn more about where these royalties come from.

Educational Use in Australia

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In Australia, educational institutions can copy any program from a television or radio broadcast, and communicate that copy, provided that the institution has a Screenrights licence. The films, TV shows, documentaries and other screen projects that are copied by educators are used in the classroom for educational purposes.

The licences fees paid by educational institutions become educational royalties.

Screenrights collects information about the programs that are copied and communicated for educational purposes and allocates the educational royalties to those programs.

Copying royalties

Educational copying royalties are triggered when a copy is made of a film, TV show, documentary or other screen project from a broadcast. This copy could be made on physical media (such as a DVD) or on digital media (such as a hard drive in a content management system). Educational royalties are also triggered when a new copy is made of a previous copy of a broadcast.

Educators can also copy films, TV shows, documentaries and other screen projects from the internet as long as they have been broadcast and sourced from the broadcaster’s website or other legally available online video channels.

Communication royalties

Educational communication royalties are triggered when a copy of a broadcast is communicated. The most common means of communicating a program within educational institutions is by making the program available for viewing on an intranet.

Performance in the classroom

There are no secondary royalties for the playing or performance of a copy of a film, TV show, documentary or other screen project in the classroom.

Streaming screen content in the classroom

There are no secondary royalties for streaming a film, TV show, documentary or other screen project in the classroom. As a licensed educational institution is not making a copy of the program or communicating a copy of the program, streaming activities do not fall under the Screenrights licence and therefore no royalty is triggered.

Educational Use in New Zealand

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In New Zealand, educational institutions can copy any program from a television or radio broadcast and from the internet, and communicate that copy, provided that the institution has a Screenrights licence. The films, TV shows, documentaries and other screen projects that are copied by educators are used in the classroom for educational purposes.

The licences fees paid by educational institutions become educational royalties.

Screenrights collects information about the programs that are copied and communicated for educational purposes and allocates the educational royalties to those programs.

Copying royalties

Educational copying royalties are triggered when a copy is made of a film, TV show, documentary or other screen project from a broadcast or from the internet. This copy could be made on physical media (such as a DVD) or on digital media (such as a hard drive in a content management system). Educational royalties are also triggered when a new copy is made of a previous copy of a broadcast or copy from the internet.

Communication royalties

Educational communication royalties are triggered when a copy of a broadcast or a copy from the internet is communicated. The most common means of communicating a program within educational institutions is by making the program available for viewing on an intranet.

Performance in the classroom

There are no secondary royalties for the playing or performance of a copy of a film, TV show, documentary or other screen project in the classroom.

Streaming screen content in the classroom

There are no secondary royalties for streaming a film, TV show, documentary or other screen project in the classroom. As a licensed educational institution is not making a copy of the program or communicating a copy of the program, streaming activities do not fall under the Screenrights licence and therefore no royalty is triggered.

Government Use in Australia

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In Australia, government departments can copy any program from a television or radio broadcast and from the internet, provided that the Commonwealth or State government has a Screenrights licence. The films, TV shows, documentaries and other screen projects that are copied by government departments are used for purposes of the Crown.

The licences fees paid by the Commonwealth and State governments become government copying royalties.

Screenrights collects information about the programs that are copied for the purposes of the Crown and allocates the government copying royalties to those programs.

Copying royalties

Government copying royalties are triggered when a copy is made of a film, TV show, documentary or other screen project from a broadcast or from the internet. This copy could be made on physical media (such as a DVD) or on digital media (such as a hard drive in a content management system). Government copying royalties are also triggered when a new copy is made of a previous copy of a broadcast or copy from the internet.

Performance within government departments

There are no secondary royalties for the playing or performance of a copy of a film, TV show, documentary or other screen project within government departments.

Streaming screen content within government deparments

There are no secondary royalties for streaming a film, TV show, documentary or other screen project within a government department. As a licensed government department is not making a copy of the program or communicating a copy of the program, streaming activities do not fall under the Screenrights licence and therefore no royalty is triggered.

Retransmission in Australia

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In Australia, cable and satellite providers, mobile phone service operators, IPTV providers and other emerging technological platforms can simultaneously retransmit the free-to-air channels over their networks as part of their overall service offering, provided they have a Screenrights licence.

The licences fees paid by the cable and satellite providers, mobile phone service operators, IPTV providers and other emerging technological platforms become retransmission royalties.

When a channel is retransmitted, so too are all the films, TV shows, documentaries and other screen projects on the channel. Screenrights collects information about the programs that are retransmitted and allocates the retransmission royalties to those programs.

Retransmission royalties

Retransmission royalties are triggered when a program being broadcast on a free-to-air channel is simultaneously retransmitted over another network.

Re-broadcasts

A re-broadcast (i.e. a second or third broadcast of a program) is not a retransmission. There are no secondary royalties for re-broadcasts.

Video-on-demand subscription services

There are no secondary royalties for streaming or video-on-demand services. Any royalties payable for S-VOD, T-VOD and A-VOD are typically dealt with in terms of the licensing agreement.